HEAR: ‘The Impact of Funders’ Processes and Practices on Voluntary Organisations’ Equality Work in London’

The HEAR logo.

HEAR’s research report The Impact of Funders’ Processes and Practices on Voluntary Organisations’ Equality Work in London was published in March 2015.

This research was carried out as part  of HEAR’s work with the London For All Partnership, funded by London Councils.

The findings identify  key points where funders’ practices  have an impact on the equality work of London voluntary organisations.

Event report on ‘Health Inequalities in London’

London Voluntary Service Council (LVSC)

Health Inequalities in London: Developing joint solutions to achieve better health outcomes for all was published in January 2015 by LVSC.

The report’s recommendations include:

  • Keep the VCS informed on future activities related to health inequalities in London
  • Develop and provide series of data training events
  • Provide training on the Social Value Act
  • Event /training on the Health & Social Care Act and implications and opportunities for the VCS
  • Develop closer links with Academic Health Science Networks (AHSNs)

HEAR Intersectionality Research report

The HEAR logo.

HEAR’s Intersectionality Research report looks at the impact on a person’s life of having multiple protected characteristics and presents case studies of VCS organisations in London that are working in this area, which is called intersectionality.

The research is funded by London Councils through the ‘London for All’ project. HEAR, the equalities and human rights network for London, launched the results of its ‘Intersections’ research on 25 June 2014.

As a network of mostly specialist equalities organisations, HEAR does not seek to work on single equalities issues, because its members are the experts, but HEAR works across all equalities strands on issues that impact on all groups and populations in London that may experience marginalisation, discrimination or denial of human rights

HEAR and its member organisations wanted to create a resource that would:

  • Showcase the work of London voluntary organisations and community groups large and small that seeks to support Londoners with intersecting aspects to their identity or experience
  • Examine both the more theoretical and policy based aspects of intersectionality and the everyday real lives of Londoners and the organisations that work with and support them
  • Generate more debate and action around intersectional issues and promote an intersectional approach across both the voluntary and public sector

Research on ‘The Impact of the Economic Downturn and Policy Changes on Health Inequalities in London’

The impact of the economic downturn and policy changes on health inequalities in London. Development of an indicator set is available on the Institute of Health Equity website.

The UCL Institute of Health Equity (IHE) was commissioned by the London Health Inequalities Network to report on the likely impact of the recession and welfare reforms in London, and to develop a set of indicators to do so. The first report was published in June 2012, setting out the IHE’s view of the likely impact of the recession, and welfare reforms, on the social determinants of health and health outcomes. 

Since then the IHE has developed an indicator set that was piloted by 5 London boroughs and launched for London analysts in October 2013. The full report, and a short document of key messages from the report are available on the IHE website.

 

Research on ‘The Impact of the Economic Downturn and Policy Changes on Health Inequalities in London’

The impact of the economic downturn and policy changes on health inequalities in London. Development of an indicator set is available on the Institute of Health Equity website.

The UCL Institute of Health Equity (IHE) was commissioned by the London Health Inequalities Network to report on the likely impact of the recession and welfare reforms in London, and to develop a set of indicators to do so. The first report was published in June 2012, setting out the IHE’s view of the likely impact of the recession, and welfare reforms, on the social determinants of health and health outcomes. 

Since then the IHE has developed an indicator set that was piloted by 5 London boroughs and launched for London analysts in October 2013. The full report, and a short document of key messages from the report are available on the IHE website.

 

ROTA report on getting the best for BAME children and young people

ROTA

In December 2013, Race on the Agenda (ROTA) published the report of it’s ‘Shaping the Future’ seminar series, which considered some of the main challenges facing London’s Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) children and young people, following a difficult economic period and wide-spread policy reforms and public spending cuts.

The 500 participants agreed some progress had been made in addressing racial inequality in our country since Stephen Lawrence was tragically murdered in 1993. However, there was overwhelming consensus that this progress was not enough; BAME children and young people still face unequal outcomes in many key areas of life. Of particular concern were inequalities faced in relation to education, training, employment, criminal justice, mental health and well-being and the lack of BAME Voice in the development of policy and practice.

The final report provides an overview of the seminars and summarises the broad ranging discussions that took place along with the solutions posed by participants to some of the key challenges identified. It includes a range of recommendations for various stakeholders including national government, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), the Greater London Authority (GLA), Ofsted, the public sector, initial teacher training institutions, local authorities, the BAME voluntary sector, school alliances, academy sponsors and chain, schools and parents. ROTA has already begun work to progress a number of these. We hope this report will support others who took part in the seminar series to do the same and that it acts as a source of evidence of need and ideas for projects they seek to develop.