Report on ’30 Years of Equalities Practice in Birmingham’

brap

From Benign Neglect to Citizen Khan. 30 Years of Equalities Practice in Birmingham was published by brap in June 2015.

A number of cities – from Plymouth to Sheffield to York – have held fairness commissions in recent years to understand why entrenched inequalities persist. As useful and, in some cases, penetrating as these commissions have been they have tended to ignore the nuts and bolts of how public agencies ‘do’ equality – how they go about tackling discrimination, eradicating social patterns of disadvantage, and fulfilling their legislative equalities duties. This is a serious gap. Understanding why these approaches have failed may go some way to explain why serious inequalities continue.

This report tries to fill that gap by:

  • exploring how one city – Birmingham – has approached equalities issues over the last 30 years
  • trying to sketch the impact of these approaches
  • suggesting how we can do things differently in the future

In an accompanying blog on the Barrow Cadbury Trust website, Joy Warmington, CEO of brap, writes about 30 years of equalities practice in Birmingham and the need for clarity, a shared vision and getting on the front foot.

Women’s Resource Centre review: ‘Impact of the Equality Act on Women’s Equality’

The Womens Resource Centre

In March 2015, the Women’s Resource Centre published Impact of the Equality Act on Women’s Equality: Reviewing the use and impact of equality mechanisms on women’s equality in London.

The purpose of this report is to review the current implementation and impact of the Equality Act 2010 and the Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED) on women’s equality in London, and to provide recommendations to both public bodies and the women’s sector on how equality legislation could be used more effectively.

King’s College London report: ‘An Age Friendly City – how far has London come?’

Kings College London

An Age Friendly City – how far has London come? was published by King’s College London and launched at a conference in March 2015 organised by Positive Ageing in London, with the UK Age Friendly Cities Network, Greater London Authority and Manchester City Council.

This report reviews research on what additional actions could be implemented to make London more age-friendly.

HEAR: ‘The Impact of Funders’ Processes and Practices on Voluntary Organisations’ Equality Work in London’

The HEAR logo.

HEAR’s research report The Impact of Funders’ Processes and Practices on Voluntary Organisations’ Equality Work in London was published in March 2015.

This research was carried out as part  of HEAR’s work with the London For All Partnership, funded by London Councils.

The findings identify  key points where funders’ practices  have an impact on the equality work of London voluntary organisations.

Event report on ‘Health Inequalities in London’

London Voluntary Service Council (LVSC)

Health Inequalities in London: Developing joint solutions to achieve better health outcomes for all was published in January 2015 by LVSC.

The report’s recommendations include:

  • Keep the VCS informed on future activities related to health inequalities in London
  • Develop and provide series of data training events
  • Provide training on the Social Value Act
  • Event /training on the Health & Social Care Act and implications and opportunities for the VCS
  • Develop closer links with Academic Health Science Networks (AHSNs)

HEAR Intersectionality Research report

The HEAR logo.

HEAR’s Intersectionality Research report looks at the impact on a person’s life of having multiple protected characteristics and presents case studies of VCS organisations in London that are working in this area, which is called intersectionality.

The research is funded by London Councils through the ‘London for All’ project. HEAR, the equalities and human rights network for London, launched the results of its ‘Intersections’ research on 25 June 2014.

As a network of mostly specialist equalities organisations, HEAR does not seek to work on single equalities issues, because its members are the experts, but HEAR works across all equalities strands on issues that impact on all groups and populations in London that may experience marginalisation, discrimination or denial of human rights

HEAR and its member organisations wanted to create a resource that would:

  • Showcase the work of London voluntary organisations and community groups large and small that seeks to support Londoners with intersecting aspects to their identity or experience
  • Examine both the more theoretical and policy based aspects of intersectionality and the everyday real lives of Londoners and the organisations that work with and support them
  • Generate more debate and action around intersectional issues and promote an intersectional approach across both the voluntary and public sector

Research on ‘The Impact of the Economic Downturn and Policy Changes on Health Inequalities in London’

The impact of the economic downturn and policy changes on health inequalities in London. Development of an indicator set is available on the Institute of Health Equity website.

The UCL Institute of Health Equity (IHE) was commissioned by the London Health Inequalities Network to report on the likely impact of the recession and welfare reforms in London, and to develop a set of indicators to do so. The first report was published in June 2012, setting out the IHE’s view of the likely impact of the recession, and welfare reforms, on the social determinants of health and health outcomes. 

Since then the IHE has developed an indicator set that was piloted by 5 London boroughs and launched for London analysts in October 2013. The full report, and a short document of key messages from the report are available on the IHE website.