Sisters For Change report: Unequal Regard, Unequal Protection – Public Authority Responses to Violence Against Black and Minority Ethnic Women in England

Sisters for Change logo

BME and refugee women are 3 times more likely to commit suicide than other women in the UK, says a November 2017 from Sisters For Change.

Unequal Regard, Unequal Protection (pdf) assesses how the UK Government and public authorities – both centrally and locally – are responding to violence against BME women in England.

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Care Quality Commission report: Annual State of Health Care and Adult Social Care in England 2016/17

Care Quality Commission

To deliver good, safe, sustainable care, more providers need to think beyond traditional boundaries to reflect the experience of the people they support.

This is according to the Care Quality Commission’s report on the state of care in England in 2016/17 (pdf), in October 2017.

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iCoCo Foundation, SchoolDash and The Challenge Study: Understanding School Segregation in England 2011 to 2016

There has been growing concern about school segregation over the last 15 years. Taking its definition of segregation from the Casey review, this April 2017 study (pdf) found:

  • In 2016, 26% of primary schools and 40.6% of secondary schools were either ethnically segregated or potentially contributing to segregation in England
  • In 2016, 29.6% of primary schools and 27.6% of secondary schools were segregated by socio-economic status, using FSM-eligibility as a proxy.

 

Crisis and JRF research – The Homelessness Monitor 2017

The Crisis logo.

The Joseph Rountree Foundation and Crisis published research into homelessness in England in March 2017. The homelessness monitor is a longitudinal study, providing an independent analysis of the homelessness impacts of recent economic and policy developments in the UK.

Jon Sparkes (Chief Executive, Crisis) and Campbell Robb (Chief Executive, Joseph Rowntree Foundation) said:

“There are serious concerns for single young people because of rising unemployment, benefit cuts and spiralling rents. Two thirds of local authorities told us they expect it to be ‘much more difficult’ to help 18-21 year olds access housing in the next few years.”

The report found that:

  • An ongoing upward trend in officially estimated rough sleeper numbers remained evident in 2016, with the national total up by 132% since 2010.
  • Fewer supported accommodation units were available for homeless people, and this accommodation was reported to be under acute pressure across the country.
  • While local authority spending on homelessness has increased somewhat (by 13%) since 2010, reflecting the priority attached to this area by central government, overall council spending on housing has dropped by 46 per cent in real terms.

Download the full report, a summary, or reports from previous years.

The Great Repeal Bill: white paper and member responses

The HM Government logo.

The government published a white paper on Brexit legislation in March 2017. The paper covered 12 key themes, including:

  • Trade: the UK is to come out of the single market and seek a new arrangement and free trade agreement with the EU.
  • Immigration: a new system to control EU migration will be introduced.
  • Expats: the government wants to secure an agreement with European countries on the rights of EU nationals in the UK and Britons living in Europe.
  • Devolution: giving more powers to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland as decision-makers.

The government also included details of its Great Repeal Bill, designed to repeal the 1972 European Communities Act and give Parliament the power to adopt parts of EU legislation into UK law.

Download the white paper.

Responses from EDF Associates
Liberty, March 2017

“This white paper has gaping holes where our rights should be. Where’s the guarantee to protect our EU rights so we don’t end up worse off than our neighbours across the Channel? Where’s the guarantee of proper democratic scrutiny?” – Martha Spurrier, Director of Liberty

Responses from EDF Observers
EHRC, March 2017

“The government should use this golden opportunity to strengthen our own laws as we leave EU laws behind, including by introducing a constitutional right to equality that will make post-Brexit Britain fairer and more united.” –  Chair David Isaac