Equality and Human Rights Commission report: Turning the Tables – Ending Sexual Harassment at Work

The EHRC logo.

‘Too many people are being silenced by toxic workplace cultures’, says  a March 2018 report from the Equality and Human Rights Commission.

Turning the tables (PDF) looks at how sexual harassment is dealt with by employers, and uses the evidence from individuals who have experienced sexual harassment at work to recommend improvements.

The report finds:

Around a quarter of those reporting harassment said that the perpetrators were third parties such as customers or clients
Many individuals believed that senior colleagues, due to their position of influence within organisations, were not challenged by HR departments or other colleagues, with some describing these individuals as ‘untouchable’
Around half the respondents hadn’t reported their experience of harassment to anyone in the workplace
In around half of the cases where individuals did report the incident, respondents said that employers took no action as a result.
Read the full report (PDF).

University of Loughborough and Law Society report: Priced out of Justice? Legal Aid Means Test

The Law Society logo

‘The legal aid means test is preventing families in poverty from accessing justice’ says a March 2018 report (PDF) from the University of Loughborough and Law Society. 

This report considers whether people required by the civil legal aid system to contribute to legal costs, based on their income and assets, can always afford to do so.

The report finds:

At the maximum level of disposable income at which legal aid is allowed, households have too little income to reach a minimum standard of living even before footing any legal bills. Typically, they have disposable incomes 10% to 30% too low to afford a minimum budget
Individuals with gross income above the £2,657 a month limit could generally afford to contribute a substantial amount to legal costs. However, some people with this level of gross income who are supporting families have incomes below the minimum, mainly because gross income includes tax credits and benefits, which contribute to meeting the cost of additional family members
Those with above £316 a month in adjusted disposable income may receive legal aid but must contribute to their costs. This excludes almost all households where anyone works, and is roughly equivalent to the level of means-tested benefits, whose recipients receive full legal aid regardless of income.
Read the full report (PDF). 

Migrant Rights Network guidance: Know Your Rights

Migrants Rights Network

As part of the School Census, schools are now required by the Department for Education to collect the nationality and country of birth of children aged 5 – 19.

This is from the March 2018 guidance from the Migrant Rights Network which aims to help migrants understand their rights and how to assert them in 8 key areas of everyday life.

This guide is to help all migrants living in the UK understand their rights in a situation where immigration rules are changing regularly.

The guidance finds:

Since 30 October 2017, banks and building societies have had to do immigration checks on all customers every 3 months. If they discover that you might be in the UK without permission they must tell the Home Office
Since 2014, the Driving and Vehicle Licence Agency (DVLA) is not allowed to give you a driving licence if you are not ‘lawfully resident’ in the UK. The DVLA does not have to let you know if they cancel your licence. This means you may not find out you are driving illegally until you are stopped by the police
Some schools have been asking to see children’s passports. This is against government guidance. Other schools have only asked for the nationality and country of birth of non-white children. This is discriminatory and therefore illegal.
Read the full guidance (pdf).

UNISON guidance: How to be a Good Ally to Trans People at Work

The UNISON logo.

‘Every non-trans person can be an ally for trans equality, but not
everyone feels confident doing this. It’s not complicated’.

This is from the March 2018 guidance (PDF) from UNISON on supporting trans people in the workplace.

The guidance recommends:

Speak up when there are no trans people present. Transphobia is always wrong and shouldn’t be ignored
Misgendering someone or using their previous name (sometimes called ‘deadnaming’) is hurtful and may be unlawful harassment
Try not to make assumptions. Although there aren’t many trans people (which is why allies are so important) they are all individual. There is no one way of being trans.
Read the guidance (pdf).