Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law article: Socio-Economic Equality Duties and the Pupil Premium

Traditionally, equality law was seen as inappropriate to address socio economic inequality. But in the last decade, a growing number of equality duties have been introduced to address this persistent form of inequality. There is, however, little research on the principles that underpin these duties.

This is according to the March 2018 article by Dr David Barrett, which seeks to address this gap through the use of data from interviews conducted with primary school personnel implementing the pupil premium.

Migrant Rights Network guidance: Know Your Rights

Migrants Rights Network

As part of the School Census, schools are now required by the Department for Education to collect the nationality and country of birth of children aged 5 – 19.

This is from the March 2018 guidance from the Migrant Rights Network which aims to help migrants understand their rights and how to assert them in 8 key areas of everyday life.

This guide is to help all migrants living in the UK understand their rights in a situation where immigration rules are changing regularly.

The guidance finds:

Since 30 October 2017, banks and building societies have had to do immigration checks on all customers every 3 months. If they discover that you might be in the UK without permission they must tell the Home Office
Since 2014, the Driving and Vehicle Licence Agency (DVLA) is not allowed to give you a driving licence if you are not ‘lawfully resident’ in the UK. The DVLA does not have to let you know if they cancel your licence. This means you may not find out you are driving illegally until you are stopped by the police
Some schools have been asking to see children’s passports. This is against government guidance. Other schools have only asked for the nationality and country of birth of non-white children. This is discriminatory and therefore illegal.
Read the full guidance (pdf).

UNISON guidance: How to be a Good Ally to Trans People at Work

The UNISON logo.

‘Every non-trans person can be an ally for trans equality, but not
everyone feels confident doing this. It’s not complicated’.

This is from the March 2018 guidance (PDF) from UNISON on supporting trans people in the workplace.

The guidance recommends:

Speak up when there are no trans people present. Transphobia is always wrong and shouldn’t be ignored
Misgendering someone or using their previous name (sometimes called ‘deadnaming’) is hurtful and may be unlawful harassment
Try not to make assumptions. Although there aren’t many trans people (which is why allies are so important) they are all individual. There is no one way of being trans.
Read the guidance (pdf).

Scottish Affairs Select Committee report: The Future of Working Practices in Scotland

The House of Commons logo.

It is deeply concerning that more than half of all employees who win a case at an employment tribunal do not receive the compensation they are due.

This is according to the UK Parliament All Select Committee publication on the future of working practices in Scotland.

In the last Parliament, the predecessor Committee launched an inquiry into sustainable employment in Scotland. They were unable to complete its work before the snap 2017 General Election, and this report seeks to build on that work, and examines the particular needs of Scotland.

The report recommends:

The Government should commission a study to assess the extent of unfair employment practices in Scotland—to establish how many workers suffer from unfair or illegal employment practices, and whether there are particular issues in certain sectors. 
Where the UK Government is planning to change spending in a way which will affect devolved funding, the Government should engage with the devolved administrations at the earliest possible opportunity on implications for devolved policy
That the Government put in place new mechanisms—which could include the establishment of additional enforcement agencies—to proactively identify and combat all unfair employment practices.
Read the full report.

House of Commons briefing paper: Social Care – Announcements Delaying the Introduction of Funding Reforms

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In July 2015, the Government announced that it would delay reforms of social care funding from April 2016 to April 2020.

In response, the House of Commons Library have published a February 2018 briefing paper outlining the postponement of these reforms. 

This paper finds:

The Government cited the expected £6 billion cost of the policy (over five years) at “a time of consolidation” as the reason for the delay, and noted the “genuine concerns raised by stakeholders” about the introduction of the changes
The Government has stated that it will publish a Green Paper on social care for older people by the 2018 parliamentary summer recess (which starts on 25 July), and undertake a parallel programme of work in regard to social care for working age adults
In December 2017, the revised date of April 2020 for the introduction of the cap was dropped and no new date was announced. The Government told the House that this postponement was necessary “to allow for fuller engagement and the development of the approach, and so that reforms to the care system and how it is paid for are considered in the round”.
Read the full report.

House of Commons Library briefing paper: Rough sleeping (England)

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‘Relationship breakdown is the largest single trigger of rough sleeping, leading to 42% of male rough sleeping’.

This is according to the February 2018 briefing paper (pdf) from the House of Commons Library. This paper provides background information on the problem of rough sleeping in England, and outlines Government policy on this issue.

The paper finds:

The most recent statistics published on 25 January 2018 recorded a 169% increase in the number of people sleeping rough in England since 2010
Among women, 35% slept rough after leaving home to escape domestic violence
Rough sleeping is at its most severe in London.
Read the full report (pdf).