Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law article: Socio-Economic Equality Duties and the Pupil Premium

Traditionally, equality law was seen as inappropriate to address socio economic inequality. But in the last decade, a growing number of equality duties have been introduced to address this persistent form of inequality. There is, however, little research on the principles that underpin these duties.

This is according to the March 2018 article by Dr David Barrett, which seeks to address this gap through the use of data from interviews conducted with primary school personnel implementing the pupil premium.

Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government green paper: Integrated Communities Strategy

Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government

We need to build the capacity of our leaders to promote and achieve integration outcomes. Do you agree?

This is from the Integrated Communities Strategy Green Paper (PDF), produced by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG), in March 2018.

The Green Paper invites views through public consultation on the government’s proposals to realise our vision of a society where people of all backgrounds get on with each other.

The paper proposes:

Measures to support recent migrants so that they have the information they need to integrate into society and understand British values and their rights and responsibilities
Core integration measures for national and local government to focus on
Measures to ensure that all children and young people are prepared for life in modern Britain and have the opportunity for meaningful social mixing with those from different backgrounds.
MHCLG are keen to hear from a wide range of interested parties from across local government, in the faith, voluntary, community and business sectors, and the general public.

The consultation will end on 5th June 2018.

Access the Government website to find out more about the consultation.

Read the Green Paper (PDF).

Equality and Human Rights Commission report: The Cumulative Impact of Tax and Welfare Reforms

‘The impact of changes to direct taxes and benefits is to reduce the income of
Bangladeshi households by around £4,400 per year on average’.

Four months after releasing their 2017 interim report, the Equality and Human Rights Commission have published their final cumulative impact assessment (pdf), in March 2018.

The report exposes how much individuals and households are expected to gain or lose, and how many adults and children will fall below an adequate standard of living, as a result of recent changes to taxes and social security.

The report finds:

Negative impacts are particularly large for households with more disabled members, and individuals with more severe disabilities, as well as for lone parents on low incomes
For some family types, these losses represent over 13% of average net income
At an individual level, women lose on average considerably more from changes to direct taxes and benefits than men
Lone parents in the bottom fifth of the household income distribution lose around 25% of their net income, on average
Around 1.5 million more children are forecast to be living in households below the relative poverty line as a result of the reforms.
EDF and a number of our members have contributed to the development of this important research.

Read the full report (pdf).

Scottish Human Rights Commission report: Building a Human Rights Culture in Scotland

The Scottish Human Rights Commission logo.

Human rights belong to everyone. We all have rights regardless of sex, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion, age, income, gender, country of birth or belief.

This is from the February 2018 report from the Scottish Human Rights Commission on building a human rights culture in Scotland.

The research tested and identified the impact of different types of messages on people’s attitudes towards human rights

The report finds:

Demographic groups of women and 16-24 year olds were most likely to become more supportive and engaged with human rights when exposed to key human rights messages
When talking about human rights, organisations involved in human rights secured the greatest levels of trust amongst all those surveyed, with 58% of participants saying they would trust them a great deal or fair amount.
This compares to 17% for a famous singer, actor, sportsperson or musician who is well known for caring about human rights
Different spokespeople affected the impact of messages. For example across all those surveyed, a disability rights campaigner has more impact than the Chair of the National Human Rights Institution when discussing disability rights.
Read the full report (pdf).